Graphical Analysis of One-Dimensional Motion| Kinematics| College Physics| Problem 2.64

Construct the displacement graph for the subway shuttle train as shown in Figure 2.18(a). Your graph should show the position of the train, in kilometers, from t = 0 to 20 s. You will need to use the information on acceleration and velocity given in the examples for this figure.

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Graphical Analysis of One-Dimensional Motion| Kinematics| College Physics| Problem 2.63

Construct the displacement graph for the subway shuttle train as shown in Figure 2.18(a). Your graph should show the position of the train, in kilometers, from t = 0 to 20 s. You will need to use the information on acceleration and velocity given in the examples for this figure.

Starship Enterprise and Klingon Ship Problem on Physics| University Physics

The Starship Enterprise returns from warp drive to ordinary space with a forward speed of 51 km/s. To the crew's great surprise, a Klingon ship is 150 km directly ahead, traveling in the same direction at a mere 21 km/s. Without evasive action, the Enterprise will overtake and collide with the Klingons in just about 5.0 s. The Enterprise's computers react instantly to brake the ship. PART A. What magnitude acceleration does the Enterprise need to just barely avoid a collision with the Klingon ship? Assume the acceleration is constant.

One-Dimensional Kinematics with Constant Acceleration| University Physics

To understand the meaning of the variables that appear in the equations for one-dimensional kinematics with constant acceleration. Motion with a constant, nonzero acceleration is not uncommon in the world around us. Falling (or thrown) objects and cars starting and stopping approximate this type of motion. It is also the type of motion most frequently involved in introductory kinematics problems. The kinematic equations for such motion can be written as x(t)=xi+vit+12at2, v(t)=vi+at, where the symbols are defined as follows: x(t) is the position of the particle; xi is the initial position of the particle; v(t) is the velocity of the particle; vi is the initial velocity of the particle; a is the acceleration of the particle.