A Landowner with Triangular Piece of Flat Land| Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.20

A new landowner has a triangular piece of flat land she wishes to fence. Starting at the west corner, she measures the first side to be 80.0 m long and the next to be 105 m. These sides are represented as displacement vectors A from B in Figure 3.61. She then correctly calculates the length and orientation of the third side C. What is her result?

Advertisements

Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.18

You drive 7.50 km in a straight line in a direction 15° east of north. (a) Find the distances you would have to drive straight east and then straight north to arrive at the same point. (This determination is equivalent to find the components of the displacement along the east and north directions.) (b) Show that you still arrive at the same point if the east and north legs are reversed in order.

Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.17

Repeat Problem 3.16 using analytical techniques, but reverse the order of the two legs of the walk and show that you get the same final result. (This problem shows that adding them in reverse order gives the same result—that is, B+A=A+B) Discuss how taking another path to reach the same point might help to overcome an obstacle blocking your other path.

Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.16

Solve the following problem using analytical techniques: Suppose you walk 18.0 m straight west and then 25.0 m straight north. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B , as in Figure 3.60, then this problem asks you to find their sum R = A + B .)

Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.14

Find the following for path D in Figure 3.58: (a) the total distance traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.

Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.13

Find the following for path C in Figure 3.58: (a) the total distance traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.

Vector Addition and Subtraction|College Physics| Problem 3.5

Suppose you first walk 12.0 m in a direction 20º west of north and then 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B , as in Figure 3.56, then this problem finds their sum R = A + B .)

Rotation Angle and Angular Velocity| Uniform Circular Motion and Gravitation| College Physics| Openstax| Problem 6.1

Semi-trailer trucks have an odometer on one hub of a trailer wheel. The hub is weighted so that it does not rotate, but it contains gears to count the number of wheel revolutions—it then calculates the distance traveled. If the wheel has a 1.15 m diameter and goes through 200,000 rotations, how many kilometers should the odometer read?

Friction| Further Application of Newton’s Laws: Friction, Drag, and Elasticity| College Physics| Openstax| Problem 1

A physics major is cooking breakfast when he notices that the frictional force between his steel spatula and his Teflon frying pan is only 0.200 N. Knowing the coefficient of kinetic friction between the two materials, he quickly calculates the normal force. What is it?