Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.14

Find the following for path D in Figure 3.58: (a) the total distance traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.

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Vector Addition and Subtraction| Analytical Method| College Physics| Problem 3.13

Find the following for path C in Figure 3.58: (a) the total distance traveled and (b) the magnitude and direction of the displacement from start to finish. In this part of the problem, explicitly show how you follow the steps of the analytical method of vector addition.

Vector Addition and Subtraction|College Physics| Problem 3.5

Suppose you first walk 12.0 m in a direction 20º west of north and then 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B , as in Figure 3.56, then this problem finds their sum R = A + B .)

Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.7

(a) Repeat the problem two problems prior, but for the second leg you walk 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º north of east (which is equivalent to subtracting B from A —that is, to finding R′ =A−B ). (b) Repeat the problem two problems prior, but now you first walk 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west and then 12.0 m in a direction 20.0º east of south (which is equivalent to subtracting A from B —that is, to finding R′′ = B - A = - R′ ). Show that this is the case.

Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.5

Suppose you first walk 12.0 m in a direction 20º west of north and then 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B , as in Figure 3.56, then this problem finds their sum R=A+B.)

Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.4

Suppose you walk 18.0 m straight west and then 25.0 m straight north. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B, as in Figure 3.55, then this problem asks you to find their sum R = A + B .)