Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.7

(a) Repeat the problem two problems prior, but for the second leg you walk 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º north of east (which is equivalent to subtracting B from A —that is, to finding R′ =A−B ). (b) Repeat the problem two problems prior, but now you first walk 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west and then 12.0 m in a direction 20.0º east of south (which is equivalent to subtracting A from B —that is, to finding R′′ = B - A = - R′ ). Show that this is the case.

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Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.5

Suppose you first walk 12.0 m in a direction 20º west of north and then 20.0 m in a direction 40.0º south of west. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B , as in Figure 3.56, then this problem finds their sum R=A+B.)

Vector Displacement| Vector Addition and Subtraction: Graphical Method| Two-Dimensional Kinematics| College Physics Problem 3.4

Suppose you walk 18.0 m straight west and then 25.0 m straight north. How far are you from your starting point, and what is the compass direction of a line connecting your starting point to your final position? (If you represent the two legs of the walk as vector displacements A and B, as in Figure 3.55, then this problem asks you to find their sum R = A + B .)

A Flower Pot Falling Past a Window| University Physics

As you look out of your dorm window, a flower pot suddenly falls past. The pot is visible for a time t, and the vertical length of your window is Lw. Take down to be the positive direction, so that downward velocities are positive and the acceleration due to gravity is the positive quantity g. Assume that the flower pot was dropped by someone on the floor above you (rather than thrown downward).

Rearending Drag Racer| University Physics

To demonstrate the tremendous acceleration of a top fuel drag racer, you attempt to run your car into the back of a dragster that is "burning out" at the red light before the start of a race. (Burning out means spinning the tires at high speed to heat the tread and make the rubber sticky.) You drive at a constant speed of v0 toward the stopped dragster, not slowing down in the face of the imminent collision. The dragster driver sees you coming but waits until the last instant to put down the hammer, accelerating from the starting line at constant acceleration, a. Let the time at which the dragster starts to accelerate be t=0.

Half the Distance and Half the Time Problem| University Physics

Julie drives 100 mi to Grandmother's house. On the way to Grandmother's, Julie drives half the distance at 35.0 mph and half the distance at 65.0 mph. On her return trip, she drives half the time at 35.0 mph and half the time at 65.0 mph. PART A. What is Julie's average speed on the way to Grandmother's house?